Posted by The PRW Staff on June 17, 2013

Join the Center for Media and Democracy at this year's Netroots Nation conference in San Jose, California. On Friday, June 21, CMD is hosting a panel called "ALECexposed: Strategies and Tactics for our 2013 Campaign" taking place at 10:30am in the Town Square. See the panel description here.

ALEC Exposed logoThis session will focus on the strategies and tactics being used by groups and individuals working to expose ALEC, including our work on ALECexposed.org and our reporting on ALEC at PRWatch.org. It will include new angles to our corporate campaign, new tactics in our outreach to legislators and new research on ALEC "stink tanks" and on immigration, guns, voting, climate, federal legislation among other issues.

The panel will feature Rashad Robinson of Color of Change, Rep. Mark Pocan (newly elected Congressman from Wisconsin's 2nd district), Aniello Alioto of ProgressNow, and Marge Baker of People For the American Way.

If you are attending Netroots Nation 2013 in San Jose, we'd love to see you at our panel on Friday morning at 10:30am for a lively discussion about how to fight back against ALEC's influence in our states. Please let us know you are coming by joining our Facebook event here.

CMD will also have a booth at Netroots -- please stop by and say hello!

Comments

I am so very sorry to miss this year's Netroots Nation. It will be the first time since the very first one. My thoughts and best wishes are with you. You do such good work in keeping the public aware of the damage ALEC is doing to our democracy. Greetings to all of you, especially Lisa.

This country is a Repuplic, not a democracy.

Yes. Or, to parrot-phrase, "Awwwwk. This country is a Republic, not a democracy. Rrrrawk!" :-)

I agree that this nation was a republic. I don't know what happen to this nation.

...from turning into a democracy! ;-)

The USA is a Liberal Democracy organized as a democratic republic.

Well, then, I guess they couldn't keep it. Gosh darn. :-(

It is possible and logical to be both a republic and a democracy. In the same way as I can be a man and a husband and a father, an animal and numerous other things. In fact a republic refers to a system where the affairs of state are a public matter. It is probable therefore that republics are most likely to be democracies because a democratic system is a system that provides for citizens to elect their representatives to to the governing body of a state.

I think the first Anonymous's point was that this republic has gotten too democratic for his taste. Too many of the wrong kinds of people voting, too much input from the riffraff on too many matters better left to the older and wiser (and richer). In my experience, at least, when someone makes a point of reminding us of that republic-not-democracy distinction, that's generally where they're coming from.

Bill Moyers presents "United States of ALEC," a report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of America has never heard of -- ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council.