Public Relations

PR in the New World Order

PR has a vital role to play in promoting economic globalization and fighting terrorism, according to the latest issue of The Holmes Report, a public relations industry trade newsletter. Holmes cites the musings of Jack Leslie, chairman of Weber Shandwick Worldwide and a past executive with the Sawyer Miller Group (whose role in explaining away the Colombian government's involvement with drug traffickers is detailed our book, Toxic Sludge Is Good For You).

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Carlyle Group Hires a PR Executive

Faced by controversy regarding its links to the bin Laden family and high-ranking government officials, the Carlyle Group has has named Chris Ullman, a former official with the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, as its vice president for corporate communications.

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Spin for a Spinning World

The PR industry is in dire need of PR help itself, according to industry leaders. Even before September 11, American PR firms "were looking at their first year of negative growth, slashing staff and shuttering offices as an economic slump wiped out clients and accounts," reports Andrew Quinn. According to Alan Kelly of a high-tech public relations firm in San Francisco, "We've swung from a media Camelot to what one of my colleagues has termed 'Death Valley.' "

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The Battle for Hearts and Minds

The United States is engaged in a flurry of diplomatic activity and presidential speeches designed to rally support for the war, which has begun to slip internationally. Even in Britain, America's most reliable ally, support for war has fallen from around three-quarters to two-thirds. And in the Muslim world, observes the Economist, "The burden of proof has shifted: America is being asked to prove it is not waging war against Islam."

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Warning: Industry PR Smears Good Science As "Junk Science"

Public health scientists Samet and Burke issue a strong warning in the current American Journal of Public Health about "the tobacco industry's attempt to discredit the scientific evidence on passive smoking, particularly the industry's use of the label 'junk science.' ... Unfortunately, 'junk science' has now become an ingrained pejorative. The public health community will need to be watchful in other arenas where the "junk science" gambit will be used. ... Trust Us We're Experts offer(s) a popular and cautionary account.... The lessons learned from this episode ...

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Dirty Tricks for the Pharmaceutical Industry in Australia

An Australian public relations company working for the pharmaceutical industry has been accused of running a secretive dirty tricks campaign to discredit an industry critic. Sydney-based Susan Andrews Communications Group, which helped promote arthritis pill Celebrex for Pfizer and Pharmacia, was named in last week's Medical Observer magazine as the source of leaked documents attempting to smear former Government drug adviser Professor David Henry.

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US PR War, Snagged in Mixed Messages, Readies Celebrity Ads

The Bush administration is launching a major PR offensive this week to sell its Afghanistan bombing campaign to Muslims, and top US PR coordinator Charlotte Beers is working on a TV and advertising campaign to be aired abroad that "could feature American celebrities." However, the US is already tripping over mixed messages, preparing the citizenry at home for a long bloody conflict, while Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld assures foreign leaders and media that the war "might be over in a matter of months," just what they want to hear.

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Media Coverage and Old Growth Forests

Environmental activists are stereotyped sometimes as head-in-the-sand hippies, but the protesters who are blockading logging in Western Australia are "some of the most organised and tactically smart activists around," according to Aizura Hankin, who profiles Louise Morris, a self-described "media liaison (media slut), police/industry liaison, and lock-on wench" for the anti-logging campaign.

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The Battle for the Disenfranchised Majority

"In the aftermath of Sept. 11, the United States finds itself embroiled in two different battles," writes Princeton University history professor Nicholas Guyatt. "The first, waged on the plains and in the mountains of Afghanistan, pits the world's richest nation (and most powerful military) against one of the world's poorest. It's not hard to predict that the United States will probably win this war, although its task in finding a legitimate replacement for the Taliban may be much harder.The second battle, however, is of an altogether different order of magnitude.

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Ad War for the Air War

The State Department is talking to the Advertising Council about crafting a "public diplomacy" campaign to help "sell America" to Muslims upset about the war in Afghanistan. "Overseeing those talks is Charlotte Beers, the new Undersecretary of State for public diplomacy and former advertising executive at J. Walter Thompson who started in the industry marketing Uncle Ben's Rice," reports the Sydney Morning Herald. But Osama Siblani, publisher of the Arab American News, suspects that Americanism may be harder to sell than white rice.

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