Nuclear Power

Nuclear Industry Offers Nevada Hush Money

Image from an NEI ad"We all knew it would come to this, didn't we?" a Las Vegas Review-Journal editorial asks, of a new offer by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) to pay Nevada to accept nuclear waste at the controversial Yucca Mountain storage facility.

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Labor Lobby Spending on Nukes Revealed

As the Center for Media and Democracy noted previously, British government funds were used "to campaign in favour of Tony Blair's new nuclear power programme." Scotland's Sunday Herald reports on the more than £15,000 spent on "Nuklear21," a "campaign group that brings together workers from five trade unions at nuclear plants acr

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Did Consultants Cook the UK Nuclear Review Books?

"I wondered why [nuclear power] was being pushed and pushed and pushed," said British parliamentarian Dai Davies, in response to news that "key consultants" working on the UK National Energy Review "have strong links to the nuclear industry." The Observer reports that AEA Technology handled public submissions for the review.

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Lovins Says U.S. Nuclear Power Is Too Dead To Jump Start

Amory Lovins, the Chief Executive Officer of the Rocky Mountains Institute, an eco-efficiency think tank, is aghast at U.S. government support for the U.S.- India Civil Nuclear Cooperation Initiative. The agreement would facilitate an expansion of nuclear power in India, which is not a signatory to the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

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Business Lobbies Hard for India's Nuclear Exemption

Robert Hoffman, a lobbyist for Oracle, describes the preliminary Congressional vote to exempt India from a ban on nuclear technology sales as "a coming-out party of sorts for the India lobby." The U.S. Atomic Energy Act bans nuclear sales to countries, such as India, that have not signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Last month, both House and Senate committees gave in-principle support to the agreement negotiated between U.S. President George W. Bush and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

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Inspectors: British Nuclear Reactors Rotten to the Core?

Some British nuclear reactor cores contain serious cracks that could limit their continued operation and potentially lead to radioactive releases, according to newly released documents from the government's own nuclear inspectorate. The documents, which had been withheld from the public, were obtained by a group seeking to close one of the most controversial reactors, Hinkley Point B. That reactor has cracks at its graphite core that the owner, British Energy, has little information about and cannot further investigate without shutting down Hinkley and perhaps other similar reactors.

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